Audrey Hepburn’s dresses and annotated film scripts go to auction at Christie’s

The Personal Collection of Audrey Hepburn (Part II) sale begins online on September 19

Audrey Hepburn on the set of the 1961 film Breakfast at Tiffany’s
Audrey Hepburn on the set of the 1961 film Breakfast at Tiffany’s

More than two decades after her death, Audrey Hepburn remains one of the most enduring icons of the 20th century, and a selection of items that helped define her stellar career will be going to auction (called The Personal Collection of Audrey Hepburn, Part I) at Christie’s London on September 27, with an accompanying online sale running from September 19 to October 3.

The Givenchy dress designed for Hepburn for the 1963 film Charade
The Givenchy dress designed for Hepburn for the 1963 film Charade
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“The sale will feature unique personal objects that have never been seen on the market, and which will offer new insights into the remarkable life of a remarkable woman,” says Adrian Hume-Sayer, head of sale and director of private collections at Christie’s. Among the standout lots is a cocktail dress designed for Hepburn by her close friend Hubert de Givenchy. Made of blue cloqué satin, trimmed with satin fringes and featuring a cummerbund belt, it was used in publicity shots for the 1967 film Two for the Road, and is expected to sell for £10,000-£15,000.

Hepburn’s annotated script for Breakfast at Tiffany’s
Hepburn’s annotated script for Breakfast at Tiffany’s
Her “For My Fair Lady” gold cigarette lighter from Gene Allen, the Oscar-winning art director of the film
Her “For My Fair Lady” gold cigarette lighter from Gene Allen, the Oscar-winning art director of the film

Another Givenchy outfit, a black satin cocktail dress comprising a fitted bodice and skirt with a hem of semi-tubular black paillettes, was designed for Hepburn to wear in the role of Regina Lampert in 1963’s Charade, in which she starred opposite Cary Grant. It is estimated at £50,000-£80,000.

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Hepburn’s working script for the film with which she is most associated, 1961’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s, is annotated throughout with her handwritten notes and revisions and is estimated at £60,000-£90,000, while three remarkable gelatin-silver production stills from the movie are expected to realise £1,000-£1,500. Other photographs of the actress, taken by the likes of Bud Fraker and Steven Meisel, start at around £800 and go up into the thousands, while a gold cigarette lighter inscribed with the words “For My Fair Lady” and engraved “Gene Allen, December 1963”, is likely to sell for £3,000-£5,000.

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