“I had waited years to immerse myself in flavours combined as only Vincent Farges can”

The Michelin-starred chef’s new Lisbon venture is an essay in minimalism

Rockfish fricassé with a stirfry of chanterelles, broad beans, marrow and clams
Rockfish fricassé with a stirfry of chanterelles, broad beans, marrow and clams

There is a complicated answer as to the meaning behind the name of Vincent Farges’ long-awaited Lisbon debut, to do with the law of universal gravitation, but the simpler version is that it is derived from the French verb épurer, which means to declutter, to refine or to purify. And that suits just fine, for the dishes that rolled out when I ate there last week were clean and lean, with every ingredient justified and flavours immaculate.

Epur’s minimalist kitchen can be partially seen on entering the restaurant
Epur’s minimalist kitchen can be partially seen on entering the restaurant

I can count the years since I first discovered Vincent Farges’ cooking by how old my youngest two children are. We were on holiday in Sintra and, upon asking where the nearest decent restaurant was, we were directed to a seafood place on the coast. We were disappointed but, learning that a Michelin-starred restaurant was next door, we returned to try that. It was memorable, to the extent that while my husband was soaring on another plane with the sommelier, I was opening colouring books and trying to occupy the children. All the same, I can still recall the perfection of the seabass, served with iodine foam.

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Roll on a decade or so and my visit to Epur, high on a hill in Lisbon’s Chiado district, was unencumbered by children. Vincent Farges says of his menu: “At 40 you know yourself; you know what your culinary identity is,” and he proves the point with confident dish after confident dish. The menu is highly minimalist and divided into “moments”, from which guests can choose anything from four to eight dishes (from €90 for four) – there are three starters (“water, greens, fields”), three mains (“sea, terroir, tradition”) and three desserts (“chocolate, orchard, vintage”). Relying on what is available at market, these change from day to day.

Michelin-starred chef Vincent Farges
Michelin-starred chef Vincent Farges

The tables are situated in an austere, clean-lined space with dishes served on Limoges porcelain. The kitchen (formerly a Bulthaup showroom and supremely spare even by restaurant-kitchen standards) was also partially on view from the moment we walked through the door, though clever design meant it never dominated.

Chocolate, chartreuse and juniper cream glacée
Chocolate, chartreuse and juniper cream glacée

Farges began with his suppliers and worked from there – he spent a year travelling around Portugal, ensuring he selected from producers who shared his passion. The resulting menu “is a cuisine that adapts to existing products and not the other way around,” he says. The wine list includes only Portuguese wines and wine pairing is offered from €40.

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On the day we visited, I had rhubarb and green curry from the “fields”, lamb, fennel and pearl barley from the “terroir” and an essay in “chocolate”’ in the form of a chocolate, chartreuse and juniper cream glacée. The standout dish was from the sea – a rockfish fricassé, which Farges paid tribute to with a stirfry of chanterelles, broad beans, marrow and clams in a well-balanced sauce. This, perhaps, is what I had waited all those years for, to immerse myself without distraction in the two or three flavours on a plate combined in a way that only Vincent Farges can.

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