Six standout international art shows – in London

Condo’s gallery exchange hosts 1960s Chicago surrealists, British provocateurs and a “Memphis science-fiction monster of a sculpture”

Dreams of a Disillusioned Misstep in the Valley of the Rocks, 2019, by Sedrick Chisom
Dreams of a Disillusioned Misstep in the Valley of the Rocks, 2019, by Sedrick Chisom | Image: Courtesy of the artist and Matthew Brown Gallery, Los Angeles. Photograph: Damian Griffiths

January is a slow month for art sales, which is why São Paulo-born, London-based gallerist Vanessa Carlos created Condo – a collaborative project that invites international galleries to create shows in another participating space. Seventeen galleries are taking part in the exchange in London this month, and the project has been so successful that the format has expanded to New York, São Paolo, Mexico City and Shanghai. These are the London highlights.

Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Modern Art
Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Modern Art

Matthew Brown shows Sedrick Chisom at Pilar Corrias

In Fitzrovia, Los Angeles-based Matthew Brown gallery brought large mixed-media canvases (from $6,000) to Pilar Corrias’s basement space. The narrative works by 30-year-old US artist Sedrick Chisom are a take on afro-futurism, where people of colour explore the universe having abandoned a dying earth. With echoes of Peter Doig and Michael Armitage, Chisom’s works balance fiction with an overwhelmingly lush palette. Pilar Corrias, 54 Eastcastle Street, London W1 (pilarcorrias.com); until Feb 8.

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Team Gallery inc shows Paul Mpagi Sepuya at Modern Art

With a 2019 Artforum cover to his name, Mpagi Sepuya has quickly established himself at the forefront of contemporary photography. His beautifully composed images sit somewhere between sculpture and self-portraiture, and completely re-address the concept of the gaze. They feel intimate and erotic, yet also exceptionally smart and reflective. This is the artist’s first solo show in the UK (with small pieces starting at $4,000), and a perfect opportunity to look at work that both reveals and conceals the production of an image. Top marks. Modern Art, 50-58 Vyner Street, London E2 (modernart.net); until Feb 15.

Lloyd Corporation’s found telephone poles at Carlos/Ishikawa
Lloyd Corporation’s found telephone poles at Carlos/Ishikawa

Lloyd Corporation at Carlos/Ishikawa

Lloyd Corporation are one of the most interesting, provocative and political duos on the British art scene. This new installation, like much of their work, unpicks the economic structures of contemporary life. The room is filled with found telephone poles, where found posters, adverts and hand-scrawled signs from the streets of London are pinned and pasted, touching on everything from the Windrush scandal to lost bunnies (pieces from £5,000 to £20,000). Carlos/Ishikawa, Unit 4, 88 Mile End Road, London E2 (carlosishikawa.com); until Feb 8.

Rubem Valentim took the iconography of Afro-Brazilian religion and transformed it into his own visual language
Rubem Valentim took the iconography of Afro-Brazilian religion and transformed it into his own visual language

Corbett vs Dempsey show Chicago Imagists at The Approach, alongside Rubem Valentim

Above a pub in Bethnal Green, Chicago’s informative Corbett vs Dempsey gallery shows works on paper by the city’s historic Imagists – a group of surrealist-inspired artists active in the 1960s and ’70s. The pieces (from $12,000) include the delicate lines of former nun Barbara Rossi, early angular watercolours by Robert Lostutter and figurative stylised sketches by Karl Wirsum. They are accompanied by the graphic paintings and votive sculptures of the late Rubem Valentim, a self-taught artist who took the symbolism and iconography of Afro-Brazilian religion and transformed it into his own visual language. The Approach, 1st Floor, 47 Approach Road, London E2 (theapproach.co.uk); until Feb 16.

 Blue, 2018, by Zeinab Saleh, at Mother’s Tankstation
Blue, 2018, by Zeinab Saleh, at Mother’s Tankstation

Chateau Shatto shows Zeinab Saleh at Mother’s Tankstation

The group exhibition by the Los Angeles gallery highlights one of the stars from last year’s Slade BA show: Zeinab Saleh. The Kenya-born, London-based artist’s practice involves drawing, video and publishing, but it’s her canvases (from £1,700) that are the focus here. Drawing upon diverse themes such as the representation of Islam and the influence of technology, Saleh resists the pigeonholing of cultural cliché while demonstrating a fluidity of line and lean take on figuration. A smart cookie who is quietly making her name as a serious young voice. Mother’s Tankstation, 58-64 Three Colts Lane, London E2 (motherstankstation.com); until Feb 8.

Navigator, 2019, by RM Fischer
Navigator, 2019, by RM Fischer | Image: Courtesy the artist and Southard Reid. Photograph: Lewis Ronald

RM Fischer at Southard Reid

Fischer stood out like a big sculptural bomb alongside a presentation of varied works from Istanbul gallery Öktem Aykut. The seventysomething American sculptor’s work has increasingly taken the form of post-junk ritualistic totems. One example from 2019 ($40,000) is perhaps closer to his earlier work – a monstrous piece of architectural, dsyfunctional furniture, with a touch of Memphis science-fiction about it. Southard Reid, 7 Royalty Mews, London W1 (southardreid.com); until Feb 8.

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