Concrete artworks that will give philanthropists a kick

Antony Gormley and Robert Del Naja are among the 50 contemporary artists who have created pieces on concrete slabs to raise funds for Rett UK

Los Angeles artist Robin Eisenberg’s slab
Los Angeles artist Robin Eisenberg’s slab

Fifty concrete slabs have been turned into covetable art by contemporary artists, and are to be sold on Sunday September 30, with all proceeds going to Rett UK, a charity that supports the families of those with neurological disorder Rett syndrome.

Fred Coppin specialises in urban scenes
Fred Coppin specialises in urban scenes

Artworks by Antony Gormley, street artist Robert Del Naja and fashion designer Henry Holland are included in the collection, which was brought together by art fanzine Pavement Licker and contemporary art dealer Jennifer McCormick, founder of Helium London. Each artwork is the same size – 40cm square with a weight of 10.5kg –  and will be sold for £1,000. Buyers can register online from 9pm on Sunday September 23, receiving a code to access the e-store when it opens a week later. The artworks will be offered in a blind sale on a first-come, first-served basis.

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While many might find a block of concrete an unusual canvas, the 50 responses are fantastically varied and creative. Some slabs are covered entirely as paintings, whether graphic (Want Some Studio takes on Pop Art and politics), abstract, illustrative or in a graffiti style. Other artists have chosen to expose some of the concrete – a textural background for written messages, for example, or three-dimensional designs. Interior designer Rhonda Drakeford, for example, has opted for bold simplicity by threading two chunky rope cords through the concrete, which arch over the surface.

The slab by Newcastle artist Johnnyx
The slab by Newcastle artist Johnnyx

West Country artist Marcus James – who has collaborated with Alexander McQueen, Yves Saint Laurent and Stella McCartney – takes another unusual approach, drilling circles to represent Carrauntoohil, the mountain with the highest peak in Ireland. “The drilled outlines represent the contours of this intimidating ridge,” he says. “There is no real path and you have to scramble from rock to rock. Each large chunk of granite plays the role of a natural paving slab.”

Want Some Studio’s piece takes on Pop Art and politics
Want Some Studio’s piece takes on Pop Art and politics

In a beautiful charcoal, pencil and paint portrait, Kent artist Patrick Morales-Lee considers the idea of ceremonies and the meaning to be found in the everyday. A striking red, yellow and blue creation comes from Dutch artist Rutger de Vries, who uses self-built painting machines, questioning authorship and the role of the contemporary fine artist. 

Rhonda Drakeford’s slab features two overlapping rope cords
Rhonda Drakeford’s slab features two overlapping rope cords

The artists will be introduced at a private exhibition in Marylebone on Thursday October 4, as part of Frieze Week.

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