Nutrient-rich dry masks for face and body

Nannette de Gaspé’s “waterless” technology aims to smooth and perk up almost every part of the body – even your derrière

Nannette de Gaspé Plumping & Lifting Techstile Infusers Tush/Derrière, £130
Nannette de Gaspé Plumping & Lifting Techstile Infusers Tush/Derrière, £130

Welcome to the world of waterless masks – patented beauty technology that lays claim to delivering far more in the way of skin nutrients than an old-fashioned wet mask ever could. Canadian brand Nannette de Gaspé owns the concept that there’s (almost) no area of the body that can’t benefit from a dry sheet mask. Yes, even your bottom. Should it need perking and smoothing, the Nannette de Gaspé Plumping & Lifting Techstile Infusers Tush/Derrière (£130) has your back, so to speak. 

Nannette de Gaspé Art of Masquologie set of five masks, £300
Nannette de Gaspé Art of Masquologie set of five masks, £300

As executive chair of Biomod Concepts, founded in Quebec by Karine Théberge in 2005, Nannette de Gaspé saw potential in the relationship between textiles and skin. This led to the creation of biomimetic micro vectors, or BMVs, upon which the Nannette de Gaspé dry-mask range is built.

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BMVs are micro-droplets of natural extracts (camellia seed, shea butter and rosemary leaf extracts among them) that are so minutely infused in fabric they feel completely dry. Body heat and gentle massage warm the oils, allowing them to release into the skin under the mask. Waterless technology is effective, delivering an estimated 87 per cent active ingredients to the skin, while wet masks consist of more than 80 per cent water and glycerine, leaving little room for actives. 

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As someone who cannot bear the sloppy feel of a wet sheet mask on my skin, I have found these dry masks revelatory, although I have yet to treat my derrière. As well as masks for the face, options include Techstile masks for the bust, décolleté, mouth, neck and hands, with most masks reusable.

Jane Cunningham is a beauty journalist and blogger. An early adopter of beauty blogging, her website britishbeautyblogger.com has run for 10 years, giving (sometimes brutally) honest product reviews and beauty news. Jane collaborated with Marks & Spencer to produce a limited edition make-up range and is currently collaborating with Makeup Revolution on an eyeshadow palette. She also works with beauty brands as a creative consultant. @britbeautyblog.

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