This sleek e-store proves sustainable fashion can be chic

Antibad ups the ante on ethical clothing

Diarte cotton Byron sweater, £130
Diarte cotton Byron sweater, £130

When Agatha Lintott launched her multibrand e-boutique in 2017 her goal was to shake off the rather negative image of sustainable fashion. With buying and merchandising roles at Tom Ford and Burberry under her belt, the 31-year-old former model was ideally placed to rise to the challenge. “I started thinking about the concept for Antibad four years ago, but back then it was difficult to find ethical-minded brands that I’d happily wear to work at Burberry or out for dinner in London,” she explains. “I felt that the colour scheme was either limited to neutrals or the pieces were too artisanal, too hippyish.”

Angela Roi vegan leather goods, from the Zuri card pouch, £50, to the Madeleine mini bucket bag, £230
Angela Roi vegan leather goods, from the Zuri card pouch, £50, to the Madeleine mini bucket bag, £230
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Fast forward a few years and Devon-and-London-based Lintott has brought together a collection of 24 womenswear labels – from Europe to Korea and, in particular, the US – that translate her ethical beliefs into products rich in contemporary style and colour. Take, for example, LA-based Rafa, which creates vegan shoes from recycled materials, such as the round-toed, chunky-heeled Mini Pump (£290) in black, pale blue and lime green. By Far’s Bulgarian-made shoes, meanwhile, are created from dead-stock leather (Stella ankle-strap shoes, £325); socks from A Woven Plane (£18) are crafted in Italy in a sustainable merino/cotton blend; French brand Happy Haus works with Greenpeace-approved Detox-certified denim (cropped, flared Pantalon jeans, £225); and the classic designs by Madrid-based knitwear label Diarte (bright-red cotton Byron sweater, £130; sheer two-tone Lia top, £90) are both fair trade and fashionable. 

Rafa faux-suede Mini Pumps, £290
Rafa faux-suede Mini Pumps, £290
Diarte viscose Lia top, £90
Diarte viscose Lia top, £90

Antibad’s business model is based on full transparency – from ethical banking to carbon-neutral shipping – with the sustainable nature of each item assessed under the “Why it’s good” heading and filtered under nine categories that include organic, vegan and vintage. Lintott highlights Amsterdam-based Mud Jeans (Hazen skinny jeans, £95), which specialises in “denim done well, with a perfect fit” but also manufactures in a “fully circular” manner: its jeans are made with up to 40 per cent recycled cotton and it asks customers to send back jeans they no longer want in exchange for a discount on the next pair. But Antibad encourages customers to keep their clothes as long as possible, offering washing and aftercare advice on the site, because, concludes Lintott, “most of the damage to the environment comes from not looking after clothes properly.” And these are certainly clothes you’ll want to hold on to.

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