Playful rings that look good enough to eat

Cora Sheibani creates unique jewels inspired by cakes and puddings

Gugelhopf ring, from £6,400
Gugelhopf ring, from £6,400

I dress mostly in monochrome. My wardrobe centres around black Prada separates – cigarette trousers, a cashmere sweater and practical shoes. To this ensemble I like to add one statement-making accessory, and my current favourite is an 18ct gold and carved white chalcedony ring topped with a diamond. The work of Swiss-born, UK-based designer Cora Sheibani, my Gugelhopf ring (from £6,400) was inspired by copper baking moulds and is evocative of traditional layered cakes. It adds flair but isn’t at all flashy, providing a pop of interest against black basics but also working well with jeans. 

18ct gold chrysocolla and nephrite jade Ice Cream ring, from £6,200
18ct gold chrysocolla and nephrite jade Ice Cream ring, from £6,200
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Sheibani is the daughter of noted Zurich gallerist Bruno Bischofberger, and her exposure to artists such as Jean-Michel Basquiat and Ettore Sottsass has distinctly inspired her creativity, as evidenced by her unique, made-to-order pieces, which combine colourful stones with gold in various hues. Her rings, for example, might pair rich green malachite with a brown diamond, or rose-pink rhodochrosite with a centre sapphire.

Lozenger rings, from £5,700
Lozenger rings, from £5,700
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Her playful Pudding range also includes a delectable and surprisingly classic Ice Cream ring (from £6,200) in 18ct gold with two boules – one of deep-green chrysocolla, the other of nephrite jade – as well as the amethyst and ruby Grape Jelly ring (£8,900) in 18ct rose gold. Also delightful are the dual-toned tablet-like Lozenger rings (from £5,700) in combinations such as amethyst, striped chalcedony and rose gold. All are made in fairtrade gold by a Swiss goldsmith in the small rural village of Appenzell. 

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