To Atlanta for a Porsche 70th anniversary auction

Drive away a 1983 956 Group C racing car worth a cool $5m-$6m from a covetable collection of cars and marque automobilia

The 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 Sport is one of just 200 original lightweight versions built, $875,000-$1.1m
The 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 Sport is one of just 200 original lightweight versions built, $875,000-$1.1m

As any Porsche fan will know, 2018 marks 70 years since Ferdinand Porsche – having already created landmark automobiles such as the Volkswagen Beetle and the Mercedes-Benz SSK – produced the first car to carry his name in the form of the original 356 No 1 Roadster.

The Porsche 1983 956 Group C racing car is tipped to sell for $5.25m-$6.75m
The Porsche 1983 956 Group C racing car is tipped to sell for $5.25m-$6.75m

The anniversary has been marked with a string of events worldwide, ranging from a magnificent line-up of Porsche models being driven up the hill during this summer’s Goodwood Festival of Speed to official exhibitions in Stuttgart, Berlin and Los Angeles and the Rennsport Reunion on the Monterey Peninsula.

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And now Porsche collectors and anyone who aspires to own one will be tempted to part with their cash in a special 70th anniversary auction being staged by RM Sotheby’s at the Porsche Experience Center in Atlanta, Georgia, where more than 60 cars and 60 lots of marque-related automobilia, ephemera and spares will cross the block on October 27.

The sale includes all manner of Porsche-related items, including this limited edition writing desk designed around a 911 engine lid, $20,000-$30,000
The sale includes all manner of Porsche-related items, including this limited edition writing desk designed around a 911 engine lid, $20,000-$30,000

The sale opens with an array of Porsche racing posters, books, sales literature and advertising material dating back to the 1950s, along with rarities such as a limited edition writing desk designed around a 911 engine lid ($20,000-$30,000), a child-sized 917 racing car ($50,000-$60,000) and a tiny, one-eighth-scale Japanese-made model of a Carrera 2.7 RS engine ($7,000-$9,000).

A child-sized 917 racing car, $50,000-$60,000
A child-sized 917 racing car, $50,000-$60,000

The car section of the sale, meanwhile, includes a 944 from 1984 that is offered in virtually new condition, having belonged to an Illinois-based teacher who drove it less than 11,000 miles in 34 years. Offered at no reserve with an estimate of $35,000-$45,000, it will be sold alongside a similarly little-used 928 GTS from 1994 ($90,000-$120,000) and a 1977 911 Turbo Carrera ($140,000-$180,000) with just 27,700 miles on the clock.

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Fans of the unrestored classic, meanwhile, will be drawn to both a 1965 911 ($200,000-$250,000), which still has its original paintwork, engine and gearbox, and a remarkable 1958 356 Super Speedster ($125,000-$150,000), which had all its paint removed at the start of an aborted rebuild 35 years ago.

Top lots, meanwhile, include three models from 1973: a 911 Carrera RS 2.7 Sport ($875,000-$1.1m), which is one of just 200 original lightweight versions built; a 911 Carrera RSR 2.8 race car ($2.4m-$2.8m) that came fourth overall in that year’s 12 Hours of Sebring endurance race; and an ultra-rare Carrera 2.7 RS prototype ($1.25m-$1.5m) that was only the second example of the model to have been built.

Such values pale into insignificance, however, compared with the two stars of the sale – a 1985 959 ($3m-$3.4m) that served as one of three works entries in the 1985 Paris-Dakar Rally and the only one like it in private hands, and a 1983 956 Group C racing car that twice competed in the Le Mans 24 Hours and won both the Brands Hatch 1,000km and Can-Am Road America events in 1983. It is tipped to sell for $5.25m-$6.75m, but never fear – for a more affordable $30,000-$40,000, you could bid on a fully restored Junior 108K tractor. Yes, Porsche made those too. And they were as well put together as you’d expect.

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