Five books for kitchen gardeners

Fertilise your imagination…

Grow Fruit & Vegetables in Pots by Aaron Bertelsen (Phaidon, £24.95)

A must-read for urban kitchen gardeners, this is an in-depth and beautifully illustrated guide to growing glorious edibles in containers – complemented by 50 recipes to expand your plot-to-plate repertoire. 

Grow Fruit & Vegetables in Pots by Aaron Bertelsen (Phaidon, £24.95)
Grow Fruit & Vegetables in Pots by Aaron Bertelsen (Phaidon, £24.95)
Advertisement

How to Create a New Vegetable Garden by Charles Dowding (Green Books, £14.99) 

The market gardener’s considerable experience and knowledge pour onto the pages of this easy-to-follow guide – his no-dig organic approach can save hours of work in the garden.

How to Create a New Vegetable Garden by Charles Dowding (Green Books, £14.99)
How to Create a New Vegetable Garden by Charles Dowding (Green Books, £14.99)
The Salad Garden by Joy Larkcom (Frances Lincoln, £16.99)
The Salad Garden by Joy Larkcom (Frances Lincoln, £16.99)

The Salad Garden by Joy Larkcom (Frances Lincoln, £16.99)

The queen of the organic kitchen garden published this book in 1984 but the 2017 re-edition is just as relevant today: everything you need to know about setting up a potager and growing 200 salad plants from scratch.  

Veg in One Bed by Huw Richards (DK Publishing, £16.99)

A practical month-by-month guide by the Welsh YouTuber that reveals how you can eat food grown from one plot, year round. All the basics are here: from curating an essential tool kit to building a raised bed.

Veg in One Bed by Huw Richards (DK Publishing, £16.99)
Veg in One Bed by Huw Richards (DK Publishing, £16.99)
Grow Yourself Healthy by Beth Marshall (Frances Lincoln, £18.99)
Grow Yourself Healthy by Beth Marshall (Frances Lincoln, £18.99)

Grow Yourself Healthy by Beth Marshall (Frances Lincoln, £18.99)

If you’re considering growing fruit, vegetables and herbs to create nutritional meals, this is the book for you: useful planting plans (including one for a “gut-health garden”) for the smallest plots as well as larger gardens.

Advertisement

See also

Advertisement
Loading