Tate Modern’s new Switch House restaurant

Sweeping views match first-rate ingredients from niche suppliers

Image: © Hayes Davidson and Herzog & de Meuron

Art has had a long relationship with food, from Dutch still-life paintings to Andy Warhol’s soup cans or YBA Sarah Lucas’s Self Portrait with Fried Eggs in 1996. The latter is owned by Tate, and Tate Modern (second picture) will add to its collection of fine foodie creations in a new way on Friday June 17 with the opening of a restaurant in its 10-storey Herzog & de Meuron-designed extension (first picture).

Image: © Hayes Davidson and Herzog & de Meuron

The 150-seat restaurant will sit on the ninth floor of Switch House, offering views over London. The vista might not quite stretch as far as Yorkshire, but rare-breed beef and Swaledale lamb reared on the county’s rolling dales and free-range chickens raised on its wolds will feature on the menu, which is consciously supporting small suppliers and independent businesses.

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Cornish fish, home-cured Suffolk ham, Sacred gin distilled in north London and a craft lager specially created for the Tate by family brewery Fourpure in Bermondsey (which you’re more likely to be able to see from the restaurant window) all feature, as does coffee sourced directly from farmers in Brazil and El Salvador, then roasted in a second-world-war Nissen hut at Tate Britain.

Dishes will include chalk-stream trout with leek vinaigrette, air-dried ham and horseradish velouté; duck pastrami with dates, blood-orange salad and balsamic jelly; and Victoria sponge with coconut cream, mango compote, mandarin gel, and orange and almond tuile (third picture).

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And after eating, there will be the opportunity to head over to the Tate’s Boiler House to see another dining-related artwork, Ghanaian sculptor El Anatsui’s tapestry of bottle tops, which is part of the gallery’s new collection displays, also opening on June 17.

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