Georgie Hopton blooms at London’s Lyndsey Ingram Gallery

The artist’s garden in upstate New York acts as both palette and inspiration for her monoprints and collages, which will fill the gallery with figurative flowers and foliage this spring

Georgie Hopton at work in her studio
Georgie Hopton at work in her studio

For Georgie Hopton, there are no dividing lines between cultivating her garden, decorating her home and creating art – all take root in her intimacy with nature and an infectious delight in its everyday wonders. This spring (from February 27 to April 5), Lyndsey Ingram is giving over her gallery to an expansive display of Hopton’s work, called Georgie Hopton: Within a Budding Grove. The walls will be decorated with wallpaper based on her prints and hung with collages and monoprints (priced from £2,800 to £18,000) – even the carpets underfoot will feature her designs. All the works are inspired by the artist’s garden in upstate New York and are abstract and figurative, decorative and expressive.  

The artist uses her garden as inspiration for her collages and monoprints (priced from £2,800 to £18,000), which will be showcased at London’s Lyndsey Ingram Gallery
The artist uses her garden as inspiration for her collages and monoprints (priced from £2,800 to £18,000), which will be showcased at London’s Lyndsey Ingram Gallery
Advertisement

“Each summer I gather my excess crop, haul it into the studio and cut it up. Dried flower stems, harvested the season before, are crammed into vases; the Leatherleaf viburnum outside the door thicker and brighter despite my annual plucking, and the harvest heap, all await my usual pilfering and tinkering,” Hopton says of her process. “My work is a result of these riches and the now habitual printing that feels like a natural response to all this excess.”

Hopton’s Bird Feet design on wallpaper
Hopton’s Bird Feet design on wallpaper
Advertisement

The British artist lives a life of two halves – from early spring to autumn she resides in the restored farm in upstate New York, which she shares with her husband, the painter Gary Hume and where she cultivates a rambling plot of flowers, fruit trees and vegetables. But she spends the winter in London, where she makes her often large-scale collages from printed and painted papers, wool and string – recalling on dark, dismal days the vivid colours of East Coast America’s summer. It is this dual aspect of her work that gives it power.

See also

Advertisement
Loading