Four art exhibitions to bookmark

Look up these online sculpture shows and flash art sales

Kind of Blue, 2020
, by Stanley Whitney
Kind of Blue, 2020
, by Stanley Whitney | Image: © Stanley Whitney. Photograph by Rob McKeever, courtesy of Gagosian

Gagosian Artist Spotlight

While its global network of galleries is closed, Gagosian is supporting its artists and stimulating sales with an online series called Artist Spotlight. “We discussed presenting our scheduled exhibitions online, but that is not how they were conceived,” says Larry Gagosian. “We needed a solution that didn’t require our artists to make that compromise.” Each Wednesday, a new artist is showcased with video content and articles from Gagosian’s Quarterly magazine, while a single artwork is posted for sale on the Friday and is available for just 48 hours. Thus far, works have sold for between $20,000 and $350,000, including those by the likes of Stanley Whitney and Katharina Grosse, while tomorrow it’s the turn of New York artist Dan Colen, whose works – from drug-fuelled performances with fellow artist Dash Snow to “paintings” made with chewing gum and flowers – have courted controversy as well as million-dollar price tags. Those still to take the spotlight include Mark Grotjahn, Damien Hirst and Jenny Saville. gagosian.com

Crane, 2006, wrought in musk-ox horn and antler by James Ekpakohak, £1,450
Crane, 2006, wrought in musk-ox horn and antler by James Ekpakohak, £1,450
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Inuit Sculpture in Wiltshire

Sculpture might be more difficult to appreciate on screen than 2D artworks, but Wiltshire gallery Messums’ online Inuit Sculpture show doesn’t feel lacking. “Above all, they are staggeringly beautiful distillations of forms that speak not only of their subject – bird / hunter / fish – but what it means to be that animal and also what it means to be that material too,” says founder Johnny Messum of the collection that encompasses sculpture from across the Canadian Arctic, from the 1950s to the present day. The small carved works include the elegantly curved 2006 sculpture Crane (£1,450) wrought in musk-ox horn and antler by James Ekpakohak in Ulukhaktok, in the Western Arctic in the Inuvialuit region of the Northwest Territories; Camille Iquliq Qamani’tuaq’s 1965 stone carving Seated Woman (£2,250), in the minimalist style found in the Kivalliq area; and the lyrical c1990 Sad Owl (£2,950) by Lukta Qiatsuq. messumswiltshire.com; from 23 May, with a virtual tour on 30 May at 11am 

Lynn Chadwick’s home, showing a glimpse of the sculpture Three Elektras, 1969
Lynn Chadwick’s home, showing a glimpse of the sculpture Three Elektras, 1969 | Image: Steve Russell, courtesy of the artist’s estate and Pangolin London
A sculpture by Lynn Chadwick at the artist’s Gloucestershire home
A sculpture by Lynn Chadwick at the artist’s Gloucestershire home | Image: Steve Russell, courtesy of the artist’s estate and Pangolin London

Lynn Chadwick at Pangolin London

Sculpture gallery Pangolin London is launching its first online-only exhibition on 26 May by putting the work of a renowned British sculptor into historical context. “We were given rare access to the medieval Gloucestershire home of Lynn Chadwick – and now his son, the artist and designer Daniel Chadwick – to curate a show with film and photography,” says gallery director Polly Bielecka. “It is intended to give a more sumptuous visual experience than the virtual online viewing rooms that are now forming the substitute for global art fairs.” Works have been selected from throughout Chadwick’s oeuvre – “from the vital forms of the 1950s, whose mass is suspended on spindly legs, to the geometric forms of the ’60s and the regal, instantly recognisable cloaked couples and figures of his later career.” Prices range from £3,000 to £1.5m. pangolinlondon.com; from 26 May

Kamel Mennour and the artist Daniel Buren
Kamel Mennour and the artist Daniel Buren
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How do you See the World After this?

On the eve of its reopening, Paris gallery Kamel Mennour has asked both children and artists to respond to the question “How do you see the world after this?” The images will be unveiled on 23 May in the gallery and online. All will be priced at €100 – with the likes of Daniel Buren, Douglas Gordon and Zineb Sedira taking part – and will raise funds for the Fondation Abbé Pierre and Paris’ Necker–Enfants Malades Hospital. kamelmennour.com

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