Picasso ceramics in the spotlight

From playful painted plates to owl statuettes – at London’s Huxley-Parlour Gallery

Goat’s Head in Profile (Tête de Chèvre de Profil), 1952
Goat’s Head in Profile (Tête de Chèvre de Profil), 1952 | Image: Pablo Picasso, courtesy of Huxley-Parlour Gallery

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In 1946, a 65-year-old Pablo Picasso saw an exhibition by the Madoura Pottery workshop in Vallauris on the Côte d’Azur. He was so inspired by the show that he asked to meet the workshop’s owners, Suzanne and Georges Ramié, and began to use their tools and resources to create ceramics of his own. From this point onwards until his death in 1973, Picasso created some 600 ceramic pieces – from plates to pitchers and vases.

Grey Face (Visage Gris), 1953
Grey Face (Visage Gris), 1953 | Image: Pablo Picasso, courtesy of Huxley-Parlour Gallery
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Now, hot on the heels of the Royal Academy’s show of the artist’s works on paper, London’s Huxley-Parlour Gallery is due to put a spotlight on his ceramics, with prices ranging from £5,500 to £70,000. The selection, predominantly from the early 1950s, is typical of Picasso’s playful style and subject matter, which runs from animals to figures in Greek mythology. Highlights include painted owl statuettes (from £10,500), a monochrome jug with two high handles (£48,500) and Figure de Proue, a mermaid-like vessel with engraved scales (£18,500).

Prow Figure (Figure de Proue), 1952
Prow Figure (Figure de Proue), 1952 | Image: Pablo Picasso, courtesy of Huxley-Parlour Gallery

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