Artstagram: 10 arts feeds to follow now

Accounts to educate and titillate your insta-life. By Marianna Giusti

@artlexachung
@artlexachung

@artlexachung (85K followers)

Masterminded by Zaragoza sisters María and Beatriz Valdovín, Art-lexa Chung pairs images of the British designer and fashion plate with disparate, yet eerily resemblant, artworks — and features works by everyone from Renoir and Modigliani to Picasso and Damien Hirst. Chung is a fan herself and regularly reposts pictures from the account.

@charlottedicarcaci
@charlottedicarcaci

@charlottedicarcaci (65.8K)

“People focus on the faces in paintings, but if you look at the details you will find an incredible richness of beauty,” says Charlotte di Carcaci. The Chelsea-based jeweller, and former columnist for T Magazine, showcases her obsession with the trinkets, embroideries and fabrics that feature in masterpieces, from the Tudor era to the late 19th century.

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@imagined_interiors (51.6K)  

The project of Fernanda Pinto-Basto, an art history PhD who wrote her thesis on interiors in art history. Her feed features contemplative domestic scenes from the Flemish masters and 18th- and 19th-century European artists, and her posts offer decor inspiration and history lessons along with profoundly soothing images.

@imagined_interiors
@imagined_interiors

@titsfromthepast (20.7K) 

“We share fine art nipples” announces this provocative account’s mission to “free the nipple” of art history. The impressive range of breasts, cropped from baroque, Flemish, neoclassical and renaissance paintings, offers an alternative education in art history with detailed captions – striving to appeal to the body-positive rather than the voyeur.

@titsfromthepast
@titsfromthepast

@cmbynmonet (58.4K) 

Call Me By Monet is the brilliant hybrid art project of Mika Labrague from the Philippines, who superimposes stills of Call Me By Your Name’s Elio and Oliver – the lovers played by Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in the film – over Monet’s sunlit landscapes. Her radiant photomontages are available to buy as prints at villacapriart.com.

@cmbynmonet
@cmbynmonet

@gesubambinibrutti (29.1K)

“One day, at the Uffizi, we realised that almost all baby Jesuses in paintings look funny,” say Giulia and Maria Laura, two Florence-based friends with a passion for Christian art. “We then started to take pictures of all ugly baby Jesuses we found.” Today, the duo are sent examples of #gbb’s by art academics from around the world – “ugly Jesuses are everywhere!”

@gesubambinibrutti
@gesubambinibrutti

@womenfromhistory (118.8K) 

Curated by an archivist in Nantes, @womenfromhistory offers an exceptional collection of frescoes, ancient artefacts and prints celebrating “strong women, history and feminism” across all eras and continents. Providing extensive historical background on both subject and artist, posts range from Hathor, the Egyptian goddess of motherhood to Johannes Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring.

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@marieantoinetteofficiel (21.8K)

“Born in 1755, Queen of France”: the exquisitely curated @marieantoinetteofficiel offers glimpses into the lush life of Marie Antoinette, showcasing paintings and pictures of the royal family’s maisons and entourage paired with first-person captions. “Yesterday was the birthday of my mother Maria Theresa,” she writes under the latter’s portrait. “We have exchanged many letters since I moved to France and she has given me lots of advice on my marriage.”

@glints_of_beauty (6.4K) 

“There are no coincidences, only encounters” – specialising in classical and medieval art, @glints_of_beauty showcases beautiful, fortuitously encountered details of Byzantine mosaics, Roman and Greek sculptures, marble buildings and neoclassical paintings, tastefully presented in a grey and pink palette. Information is kept to a minimum, but each post shows the location of the artwork or building, allowing the curious follower to further their research.

@arthistoryfashion (30.8K) 

This is the brainchild of Betty Quinn, a product designer with an art history background who is interested in “examining how visual cues from the past permeate contemporary images in fashion”. Her posts reveal with shocking accuracy how codes such as body language, colour and composition are unchanged, as in her collage of an 18th-century portrait of a French noblewoman beside a Jennifer Lawrence photograph by Tim Walker for W magazine in 2012.

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