Five decades of disruption: Linder’s multisensory retrospective

The Manchester-punk pioneer gives Cambridge’s Kettle’s Yard a radical feminist makeover

Untitled, 2015, by Linder; photomontage 27.7cm x 20.6cm
Untitled, 2015, by Linder; photomontage 27.7cm x 20.6cm

Images from fashion magazines have long been scrutinised and reimagined by the radical photomontage artist Linder – ever since she burst onto the Manchester punk scene in the 1970s. One person’s swimsuit shoot becomes her piercingly witty commentary on women. Unsurprisingly, her retrospective at Cambridge art gallery Kettle’s Yard, opening this weekend, is no ordinary showcase of her five-decade career. Alongside archive album covers for bands such as Buzzcocks and her celebrated collage series, there will be new photo-compositions, soundscapes and a line of collectable gift-shop products inspired by Kettle’s Yard co-founder Helen Ede, designed to create a discourse about “women’s material absence and mythic presence”. Extending its reach to the café menu and staff uniform, the multisensory takeover promises to be a playful act of rebellion, confrontation, beauty and surprise.

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