A chandelier shaped like a bottom – and other Fiac 2019 highlights

Francesca Gavin’s five not-to-miss booths at the Paris art fair

Growing in Softness Chandelier (2019) by Laure Provost, €40,000
Growing in Softness Chandelier (2019) by Laure Provost, €40,000 | Image: Laure Prouvost, courtesy Lisson Gallery

Laure Prouvost at Lisson Gallery

The French Turner Prize winner is the focus of a small but delightful installation at Lisson. Prouvost’s twisted take on furniture centres around Growing in Softness Chandelier (€40,000), a Murano glass light that resembles a fleshy bottom holding a bouquet of flowers, and two “chairs” made of paired canvases from a series titled Early Work of Grandad, found in the tunnel of history (€15,000 each). Her work is also featured in the FIAC Project sculpture show curated by Rebecca Lamarche Vadel at the Petit Palais museum of fine arts and outside on the Avenue Winston Churchill. 

Texture Mapping (2014-2019) by Andreas Eriksson
Texture Mapping (2014-2019) by Andreas Eriksson | Image: Mareika Tocha, courtesy of Andreas Eriksson and Neugerriemschneider Berlin
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Andreas Eriksson at Neugerriemschneider

This Berlin gallery has devoted its entire booth to the calm abstraction of Swedish artist Andreas Eriksson, who draws inspiration from his home surroundings, in the middle of a forest. Among the tapestry works and museum-size paintings is a standout grid of 45 equally-sized abstract canvases, Texture Mapping (2014-19), a survey of his conceptual, considered approach to nature and representation. Eriksson’s record at auction is $54,821; this booth hints that prices will rise quickly.

Eric Baudelaire sent around 1,000 letters to members of the Houses of Commons and Lords; he has received 51 responses so far
Eric Baudelaire sent around 1,000 letters to members of the Houses of Commons and Lords; he has received 51 responses so far
Alex Da Corte’s booth showcases a playful personification of Eminem
Alex Da Corte’s booth showcases a playful personification of Eminem

Eric Baudelaire at Galerie Barbara Wein

This week’s winner of France’s prestigious Marcel Duchamp prize shows a work that highlights the comedy and tragedy of Brexit. The Franco-American artist and filmmaker sent a letter to every member of the Houses of Commons and Lords, asking: “You are leaving Europe. Where are you going?” From the 1,000 or so letters, he’s had 51 responses so far, with fascinating results. The scrawled and typed responses, framed and installed at the stand of Berlin gallery Barbara Wein, made me laugh, cry and cringe – a bit like Brexit itself…

Varão (2019) by Antonio Obá
Varão (2019) by Antonio Obá | Image: Renato Ghiazza, courtesy of Mendes Wood DM
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Alex Da Corte at Galerie Sadie Coles

A new representation of the highly talented, Philadelphia-based artist takes the form of a solo booth of giant sculptural cubes showing a playful personification of 1990s hip-hop icon Eminem. Da Corte is riding high (with prices for his installations ranging from $95,000 to $250,000) after filling two rooms at this year’s Venice Biennale with exceptional, colourful installations blending plastic and supermarket Americana with darker thoughts around identity, power, fear and meaning.  

Antonio Obá at Mendes Wood DM

This São Paulo-Brussels gallery is always guaranteed to provide new talent. Brazilian artist Antonio Obá’s figurative paintings ($6,000 to $50,000) draw on personal memories, historical archives and family stories. On show here, the strongly narrative depictions of Afro-Brazilian characters explore the cultural imposition of behaviour, images of historic black protest and the complexity of religious ritual. Obá’s practice also includes sculpture, installation and performance.

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