Arresting artworks with something to say

The Arts Club exhibition Let Me Tell You A Story gives a voice to artists – including a Turner Prize winner – wrestling with the universal concerns of love, war, gender and race

Sequences of Women with Long Tails (8) by Maryam Hoseini (2018), in acrylic, ink and pencil on wood
Sequences of Women with Long Tails (8) by Maryam Hoseini (2018), in acrylic, ink and pencil on wood | Image: Courtesy the artist, Rachel Uffner Gallery, and Green Art Gallery

Creative talent from across the globe is represented in the exhibition Let Me Tell You A Story, running at London’s The Arts Club from January 14 to April 14. Mequitta Ahuja, Derrick Adams, Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Lubaina Himid, Maryam Hoseini, Sanya Kantarovsky, Aliza Nisenbaum, Faith Ringgold and Christina Quarles are the artists tackling universal concerns such as love, war and race, alongside contemporary preoccupations with gender, privacy and social media. The work, a return to figurative painting curated by Amelie von Wedel and Pernilla Holmes of Wedel Art, is designed to reveal intimate stories, both fictional and real, with some of the pieces available for sale at the show.

Sequences of Women with Long Tails (7) by Maryam Hoseini (2018), in acrylic, ink and pencil on wood
Sequences of Women with Long Tails (7) by Maryam Hoseini (2018), in acrylic, ink and pencil on wood | Image: Courtesy the artist, Rachel Uffner Gallery, and Green Art Gallery
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The range of artists on display is substantial. Lubaina Himid, who won the Turner Prize in 2017 and was awarded an MBE for services to art in 2010, focuses on black creativity and the misrepresentation of people of colour in the media. Her work hangs in Tate St Ives. American artist Derrick Adams also tackles the subject of racial identity, as does his compatriot Faith Ringgold, who created Tar Beach 2 as a portrayal of community life in Harlem. Celeste Dupuy-Spencer dwells on scenes from her native upstate New York, Sanya Kantarovsky uses satire to explore personal anxiety and power dynamics and Christina Quarles tackles the difficulties that come with identity. The Iranian artist Maryam Hoseini addresses gender inequality, Mequitta Ahuja creates monumental paintings depicting the artistic process and New York-based Aliza Nisenbaum has produced portraits of Latin American immigrant families in the US.

Notation by Mequitta Ahuja (2017), oil on canvas
Notation by Mequitta Ahuja (2017), oil on canvas | Image: Courtesy of the artist, Wedel Art Advisory and Tiwani Contemporary
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Of the three works originally for sale, Notation, an oil on canvas by Mequitta Ahuja depicting a colourful scene of a woman working at a table, has already been snapped up, but two works by Maryam Hoseini, Sequences of Women with Long Tails (7) and (8), in acrylic, ink and pencil on wood, are available, priced under £15,000. Those interested in securing the work of other artists can contact Wedel Art directly.

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