Asia Week comes to Chelsea Harbour

A citywide celebration of the continent’s culture

Heat Haze by Katsutoshi Toya, £8,000 from Genrokuart
Heat Haze by Katsutoshi Toya, £8,000 from Genrokuart

The Design Centre at Chelsea Harbour will host Asia Week from November 5 to 9 as part of a citywide celebration of the continent’s culture and artistry, the art fair Asian Art in London (November 1-10). Seven galleries will explore the enduring appeal of Asian aesthetics through works by ChineseKorean, Filipino, Nepalese and Japanese artists – both emerging and established.

Al Series I by Kali Mee, £534 from ArtChina
Al Series I by Kali Mee, £534 from ArtChina
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Highlights of the exhibition include a selection of ceramics made especially for the show by Yoshihisa Tsuruta, using local clay from Kyushu in southern Japan, that are a nod to the country’s history (on show at Genrokuart, from £2,000). Fellow Japanese artist-craftsman Kenji Yoshida will be represented by two bold artworks at October Gallery (entitled La Vie, 1994, and La Vie, 2008, price on request), featuring metals such as goldsilvercopper and platinum, applied in thin sheets over a binding layer of Japanese lacquer.

Gia đình dê (Goat Family), Hugentobler Collection
Gia đình dê (Goat Family), Hugentobler Collection
Shady Map by Toko Shinoda, £1,500
Shady Map by Toko Shinoda, £1,500

There is a vibrant and thought-provoking display at ArtChina, including Turn a Blind Eye – a 93cm x 71cm oil-based ink lithograph on paper (£5,422) – by Chinese artist Wei Jia, and Mirror, a bold circular portrait by Hesheng Liu (which can be snapped up for £400).

Năm Giáp Dần (Year of the Tiger), Hugentobler Collection
Năm Giáp Dần (Year of the Tiger), Hugentobler Collection
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The pieces exhibited by dealer Kamal Bakhshi focus on prints and include Japanese artist Rei Morimura’s stencilled woodblocks depicting buildings hidden in fairytale landscapes (Musashikokbunji, Hiki Valley and Takahata Fudo are priced £890 each). Daniel Kelly, an American artist living in Kyoto, uses a mixture of traditional techniques and papers ­– and Read All About It (£5,500) marries Edo-period book pages with Arches cover paper, creating a three-dimensional collage of texts around two lantern woodblock prints. Lastly, An Ode and Shady Map (£1,500 each) are two among a number of limited editions by artist Toko Shinoda, who recently celebrated her 105th birthday. The artist often adds sumi (cinnabar brushstrokes) on top of her prints, occasionally using handmade paper that is three centuries old, or heavy mop-like brushes made from sheep’s wool.

The Design Centre will also host a series of talks and live demonstrations throughout the week. Interior designer Tim Gosling will delve into the depths of Georgian chinoiserie and its contemporary allure, illustrated by pattern books and engraved John Nash designs, while designer Hannah Bowen will hold court on the ancient Japanese ethos of wabi-sabi (or the “imperfectly beautiful”) ­– that informed her latest collection Japandi for Scion. Fashion illustrator Poppy Waddilove will also be in residence, demonstrating her ink and watercolour skills.

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