Leading London art gallery opens with a bang in Gstaad

Maddox Gallery opens its new international venue with a breathtaking exhibition of close-up wildlife photography

David Yarrow’s dramatic image The Untouchables
David Yarrow’s dramatic image The Untouchables | Image: David Yarrow

Since its launch in Mayfair in 2015, Maddox Gallery has expanded rapidly, opening two further London locations, in Shepherd Market and Westbourne Grove, and now an international outpost in Switzerland. Nestled on the promenade in the heart of the Swiss ski resort of Gstaad, the gallery occupies a three-storey traditional chalet, renovated by the town’s favoured high-end developer Chaletbau Matti.

A lion is captured in mid-leap in this shot, called Emma
A lion is captured in mid-leap in this shot, called Emma | Image: David Yarrow
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The first exhibition is of the work of acclaimed wildlife photographer David Yarrow, focusing on astonishing close-up images of animals (£8,000-£45,000). Polar bears and elephants gaze contemplatively into the lens, while lions leap past and Siberian tigers loll in the snow. Capturing such portraits takes great patience and not a little bit of cunning – to secure a number of the shots, Yarrow coated his camera in scents that are irresistible to wild passersby.

The new Maddox Gallery occupies a three-storey traditional chalet
The new Maddox Gallery occupies a three-storey traditional chalet
A polar bear peers at the lens in this work named Hello
A polar bear peers at the lens in this work named Hello | Image: David Yarrow

The gallery opened its doors on December 23. “I’m confident that the clientele in Gstaad will respond well to a new contemporary art destination,” says Maddox Gallery creative director Jay Rutland, “and David Yarrow was an obvious choice for me when selecting the inaugural exhibition. He has a strong global following, is highly collectable and his photography is breathtaking.” Indeed, Yarrow’s mesmerising image Mankind, depicting an endless sea of African cattle and their herders, was the highest selling lot at a Sotheby’s photography sale in May, going under the hammer for £60,000.

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