Annabel’s deco-inspired print celebrates its new incarnation

Pullman Editions captures the club’s new garden with chic aplomb

Pullman Editions’ new art deco-inspired print depicting the new outdoor space at Annabel’s, £395, edition of 300
Pullman Editions’ new art deco-inspired print depicting the new outdoor space at Annabel’s, £395, edition of 300

When regular patrons think of Annabel’s, certain distinct images come to mind – but sunshine and a garden isn’t one of them. That’s about to change, and a limited-edition artwork is on sale to mark the occasion.

The club, which Mark Birley founded at 44 Berkeley Square in 1963, is currently undergoing the most significant change in its history. After decades of being one of the most glamorous nightclubs in London, it’s moving to number 46, where it will take over 2,400sq m above as well as below ground, and become an all-day experience ­– complete with a terraced garden.

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Ahead of opening to members in early 2018 (the current space will be open until a week beforehand), Charles Avalon of Pullman Editions, the renowned London-based poster design company, has created a limited edition deco-inspired print (£395, edition of 300) depicting the new outdoor space. The incoming management at Annabel’s commissioned Pullman to put together the artwork, and their choice is apposite: for much of the life of Annabel’s, two original posters from the Pullman Gallery, Etoile du Nord and Nord Express, have been hanging on the wall of the dining space. The style is sheer Annabel’s – chic, social and harking back to a dressier age.

“Pullman and Annabel’s both represent an integral part of London’s history and culture,” says Avalon. “The poster echoes the traditional art deco style Pullman is known for, portraying one of the most exciting spaces in the new club – the enormous garden terrace, one of the largest in London. We envisage it being the beating heart of the new club. The limited-edition poster truly encapsulates how Annabel's is moving forward and transforming itself, while staying true to its rich legacy.”

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