Five ways to commission artworks for your home

From steel sculptures to stained-glass windows

Fenella Elms’ Thames Flow, from £7,000
Fenella Elms’ Thames Flow, from £7,000

Wall panels Fenella Elms’ intriguing and sinuous porcelain wall pieces push her material’s delicacy to its limits. Works such as the swirling Fungal Form (£6,000) and linear Green Ladders (£5,500) are composed of numerous wafer-thin ribbons of porcelain, but it is her larger pieces, such as the Flow series – panels of small porcelain discs layered into sweeping, undulating relief patterns – that are proving most popular with her bespoke clients. Recent commissions include a series of five framed highly textural panels (similar commissions about £16,000) in two-tone grey/green for a client in Moscow, and Thames Flow (from £7,000), which combines her ceramic technique with a patinated brass “river”, made by specialist metalworkers. CHARLOTTE ABRAHAMS. See more of Fenella Elms’ work here.

Carne Griffiths’ Afternoon Tea with the Queen, bespoke portraits from £6,000
Carne Griffiths’ Afternoon Tea with the Queen, bespoke portraits from £6,000
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Portraits Carne Griffiths’ Afternoon Tea with the Queen is a portrait of the British monarch with a difference. It combines calligraphy inks, spraypaint and graphite with the more unusual materials of tea, whisky, diamond dustings and 24ct gold leaf. “I love bringing together disparate elements in my paintings,” says the artist, who has worked for the likes of AspreyBurberry and Chanel and featured in exhibitions in MilanHong Kong and London’s Royal Academy. His portraits break down at the edges into floral motifs and flourishes, and his celebrity subjects have included Heidi Klum and Kate Beckinsale, while his illustrations of Donald Sutherland and Jesse Eisenberg can be found in recent editions of The New York Observer. Bespoke portraits start at £6,000. MARGARET KEMP. See more of Carne Griffiths’ work here.

Patrick Reyntiens’ Oh! The Tsunami, £495
Patrick Reyntiens’ Oh! The Tsunami, £495 | Image: Goldmarkart
Andy Scott with Baron, one of the model horses for the Falkirk sculpture
Andy Scott with Baron, one of the model horses for the Falkirk sculpture | Image: Martin Shields

Stained glass Patrick Reyntiens is widely regarded as Britain’s foremost stained-glass artist. His work graces the Great Hall at Christ Church in Oxford and the National Cathedral in Washington DC, but less well known are his highly exuberant personal projects. Pulsating with movement and colour, they feature energetic acrobats, tumbling clowns and a fat ringmaster in the Circus series; dramatic thespians in the commedia dell’arte panels (including a vignette of Kenneth Branagh); and, in The Triumph of Dame Edna, six individual portraits of Mme Everage complete with overblown coiffure, pearls and spectacles. The intimate mini-windows (£395-£895) – small, single panels measuring 30cm x 35cm – are delicately handpainted by Reyntiens and made from handblown antique glass with his youngest son, John, an acclaimed stained-glass artist in his own right. Though now in his 90s, Patrick still accepts bespoke commissions for private homes, schools, churches and public buildings internationally. NICOLE SWENGLEY. See more of Patrick Reyntiens’ work here.

Rita Parniczky’s work, hanging at her 2016 solo show Weaving with Light; The Forest of Architectural Monofilament
Rita Parniczky’s work, hanging at her 2016 solo show Weaving with Light; The Forest of Architectural Monofilament
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Steel sculptures Scottish artist Andy Scott made a splash in 2013 when one of his highly dramatic public installations was revealed in Falkirk. Made up of two gargantuan steel Clydesdale-inspired horse heads, it sent demand for Scott’s striking sculptures (from £120,000) soaring, with clients from the UK to Australia commissioning him to capture a bespoke likeness of a beloved horse in galvanised steel. “Each commission is very specific,” explains Scott, adding that he prefers to meet clients in person to understand their exact wishes and see the site where the sculpture will sit. Recent requests include a collection of four galloping horses installed on a Long Island lawn, and a Clydesdale head for the veterinary school at the University of Edinburgh. Pieces usually take six months to a year to complete. CHRISTINA OHLY EVANS. See more of Andy Scott’s work here.

Weavings “I like the idea that I am creating a complex piece from something as simple as a single thread,” says Rita Parniczky of her chosen artistic medium. It’s a satisfaction shared by many textile artists, but the results achieved by Parniczky, who combines weaving techniques with photographic technology, are utterly unique. By placing her woven creations (from £3,500) directly onto the surface of photographic paper and exposing them to light in a darkroom, she reveals the vertical warp structure in much the same way that an X-ray uncovers a skeleton. “My technique allows me to reveal what is usually hidden,” she says. “Sunlight passing through the material visually transforms the work, making it appear to be formed of crystals or ice.” The diaphanous works (one of which the V&A has acquired, while a recent private commission came from the owner of a contemporary house in Suffolk) work best when suspended a few centimetres away from walls. CHARLOTTE ABRAHAMS. See more of Rita Parniczky’s work here.

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