How To Spend It

Art | The Cult Shop

Andrew Logan

A wonderland of glass-and-mirror accessories reflects its owner’s deeply eclectic vision.

February 26 2012
Nicole Swengley

Tucked in the shadow of Renzo Piano’s Shard in Bermondsey is the dazzling jewel box that comprises artist Andrew Logan’s shop-cum-gallery. Step inside and your senses are assailed by ultramarine walls and a mirrored ceiling reflecting the glittering jewellery, personal accessories and homewares – all meticulously crafted by Logan from mirror fragments, glass, glitter and “found” objects set in resin. “The idea was to have a window on the world,” says Logan who converted the building – a former garage – into a studio 20 years ago, but never had a permanent outlet for his work until September 2010.

Logan’s jewellery turns vintage display cabinets into kaleidoscopes of colour, shape and texture. Each piece is signed, dated and named and has its own undeniable personality. These include a crescent-moon brooch with mirror slivers (£300), star-shaped earrings (£150), a bejewelled hairpiece (£300), a huge necklace with three circular mirrors (£400), a dragonfly brooch (£450), cocktail rings (£100), mirror-work cuff links (£160) and big, bow-tie brooches (£160). Flamboyant buckles glamorise coloured suede and leather belts (from £300), while alphabetical letters (from £130) are enlivened with painted and gilded glass.

Logan’s portfolio also encompasses public art projects such as the bronze Millennium Pegasus, with its glass-inlaid wings, which stands on the Dudley Bypass. What unites such large-scale sculptures with these mini artworks is their ability to lift the spirits, intrigue the eye and provoke a smile. Fans include Brian Eno, Bono, Julie Christie, Elton John, Zandra Rhodes and Gwyneth Paltrow, while City executives, medics and media folk have sought out Logan since the shop opened. “I’m here most days and people like to talk about the work because the pieces are very personal – each has a little story,” he says.

Portrait-shaped wall mirrors bounce light around (the biggest depicts the Dalai Lama, £10,000), offering various views of the elaborate Mermaid chandelier (£25,000), the picture frames (from £500) and jewel boxes (£2,500). Tall glass cabinets house sculptural figures such as Sea-ing is Believing, a bust of Nelson with a greeny-blue glass wave sluicing his shoulder (£3,000). A bejewelled hand mirror (£2,500) and a fascinator whose net is replaced by chicken wire (£700) appear to await Lady Gaga’s arrival.

Logan describes his work as an “artistic adventure”, so shells from a Goan beach mix with faux pearls in brooches (£360), while watercolours from his travels are also available (from £250). But glass remains Logan’s favourite medium: “I love working with glass and mirrors – the reflections are hypnotic. It’s a kind of magic – as if I’m playing with light from the universe.”